Riviera Video Tip: Should hiring managers be “trained” to interview?

 

Watch Riviera Advisors’ Principal Consultant, John Carrozza‘s comments here.

 

Recruiters are consistently seeking to improve their interview process. But are hiring managers trying to improve theirs? When you finally find that candidate that fills all the skills and requirements needed, is that hiring manager understanding the value that candidate offers? Or… does the hiring manager even understand the hiring process? Communication is key throughout the interview process with the hiring managers and recruiters. Scheduling a meeting with your hiring manager to go over interview tips and processes would benefit the HR department. They might be knowledgeable about the industry itself, but do they know how to fill an open position? Hiring managers should be able to cover the legal requirements, ensure consistency, and understand the cost per hire. During an interview process, hiring managers shouldn’t just follow a script. They should have a conversational flow without asking questions that may upset a potential candidate and turn into a legal situation. “Most hiring managers have enough common sense not to include, “What’s your religion?” or “How many kids do you have?” on their list of interview questions, but we cover all the legal do’s and don’ts surrounding the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s protected classes, just in case. We want them to be confident they can conduct a bold, insightful interview without making any missteps on behalf of the company. When you know you’re doing it right, there’s no need to be timid…” (Kelsie Davis, Bamboo HR). Hiring managers need to ensure consistency. They need to understand that their actions reflect their organization’s brand. If they provide an inconsistent process, it may lead to inconsistent results. When measuring inconsistent results, how do you know which process is working and which process isn’t? Hiring managers should also understand the cost per hire. Cost per hire should be established in the beginning of the hiring process. Knowing the cost per hire should be a tool to pick only the top talent in the candidate pool because hiring a bad hire can impact the rest of the organization financially and will end up spending more money to source and recruiter other candidates.

Watch Riviera Advisors’ Principal Consultant, John Carrozza‘s comments here.

What does your organization do today to prepare Hiring Managers for successful interviewing?  Let me know in the comments below.  Thank you.

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